Continually texting and emailing from her smartphone strained the tendons in this tech reporter ’ s phone thumb, which turns out to be an increasingly common condition.

Source: NYT HealthCategory: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Text Messaging Smartphones Addiction (Psychology) Anxiety and Stress Tendinosis Acupuncture Source Type: news

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Various types of therapies have proven to be useful in alcohol and drug rehab programs, but music therapy is a tool that many individuals seeking treatment may not understand fully.
Studies have shown that music therapy provides significant healing, emotionally, physically, and mentally, and it may end up being an important aspect of your own substance abuse treatment.
What Is Music Therapy?
Music therapy is very different from music in the form of entertainment. It is a clinical and evidence-based therapeutic practice that utilizes music to accomplish goals within an individual’s therapy program.1 Each client&rsquo…

Source: World of PsychologyCategory: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction Alcoholism Creativity Habits LifeHelper Psychology Psychotherapy Recovery Substance Abuse Treatment Drug rehabilitation Music Therapy Source Type: blogs

by HANS DUVEFELT, MD
My second foray into Suboxone treatment has evolved in a way I had not expected, but I think I have stumbled onto something profound:
Almost six months into our in-house clinic’s existence, I have found myself prescribing and adjusting treatment for about half of my MAT patients for co-occurring anxiety, depression, bipolar disease and ADHD as well as restless leg syndrome, asthma and various infectious diseases.
Years ago, working in a mental health clinic, we had strict rules to defer everything to each patient’s primary care provider that wasn’t strictly related to Suboxone treatme…

Source: The Health Care BlogCategory: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Patients Small Practice Opioid Addiction Opioid crisis Treatment Source Type: blogs

Publication date: Available online 11 June 2018Source: Trends in Pharmacological SciencesAuthor(s): Elif Engin, Rebecca S. Benham, Uwe RudolphIn the past 20 years we have learned a great deal about GABAA receptor (GABAAR) subtypes, and which behaviors are regulated or which drug effects are mediated by each subtype. However, the question of where GABAARs involved in specific drug effects and behaviors are located in the brain remains largely unanswered. We review here recent studies taking a circuit pharmacology approach to investigate the functions of GABAAR subtypes in specific brain circuits controlling fear, anxiety, l…

Publication date: Available online 9 January 2018Source: Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological PsychiatryAuthor(s): Sarah Ch’ng, Jingjing Fu, Robyn M. Brown, Stuart J. McDougall, Andrew J. LawrenceAbstractThe bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) is widely acknowledged as a brain structure that regulates stress and anxiety states, as well as aversive and appetitive behaviours. The diverse roles of the BNST are afforded by its highly modular organisation, neurochemical heterogeneity, and complex intrinsic and extrinsic circuitry. There has been growing interest in the BNST in relation to psychopathologies…

Publication date: Available online 6 October 2017Source: Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological PsychiatryAuthor(s): Ronald Kim, Kati L. Healey, Marian T. Sepulveda-Orengo, Kathryn J. ReissnerAbstractComplex roles for astrocytes in health and disease continue to emerge, highlighting this class of cells as integral to function and dysfunction of the nervous system. In particular, escalating evidence strongly implicates a range of changes in astrocyte structure and function associated with neuropsychiatric diseases including major depressive disorder, schizophrenia, and addiction. These changes can range from as…

Publication date: Available online 9 September 2017Source: Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological PsychiatryAuthor(s): Tristan J. Hynes, Catherine S. Thomas, Alicia S. Zumbusch, Anna Samson, Ioana Petriman, Una Mrdja, Angélique Orr, Emilie Cutts, Bruce G. Ruzindana, Alimohamed Hazari, Margaret Zjadewicz, Vedran LovicAbstractMany individuals sporadically and circumstantially sample addictive drugs, yet few become addicted. The individual vulnerabilities underlying the development of addiction are not well understood. Correlational findings show that early life adversity is associated with a greater prope…

Publication date: Available online 21 June 2018Source: Neuroscience &Biobehavioral ReviewsAuthor(s): Victor Mathis, Paul J. KennyAbstractAddiction is now recognized as a neurobiological and cognitive brain disorder and is generally viewed as a switch from recreational or voluntary to compulsive substance use despite aversive consequences. The habenula, composed of medial (MHb) and lateral (LHb) domains, has been implicated in regulating behavioral flexibility and anxiety-related behaviors and is considered a core component of the brain “anti-reward” system. These functions position the habenula to influence…

Publication date: February 2018Source: Neurobiology of Stress, Volume 8Author(s): Jessica L. Bolton, Christina M. Ruiz, Neggy Rismanchi, Gissell A. Sanchez, Erik Castillo, Jeff Huang, Christopher Cross, Tallie Z. Baram, Stephen V. MahlerAbstractEarly-life adversity increases the risk for emotional disorders such as depression and schizophrenia. Anhedonia, thought to be a core feature of these disorders, is provoked by our naturalistic rodent model of childhood adversity (i.e., rearing pups for one week in cages with limited bedding and nesting, LBN). Drug use and addiction are highly comorbid with psychiatric disorders fea…

AbstractPurpose of ReviewNonmedical use or addiction of sedative-hypnotics is commonly seen among patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). The aim of this article is to review the prevalence of, the relationship between, and the current treatment of MDD comorbid with sedative-hypnotic use disorder.Recent FindingsApproximately 3 –5% of general population is prescribed sedative-hypnotic medications and prescribing of these agents is more common in women and the elderly. About 2.3% of the US population reported using hypnotics nonmedically, with 0.6% reporting using sedatives nonmedically. Among these nonmedical s…

AbstractOver the past decade, there have been an increasing number of studies that have investigated problematic and/or ‘addictive’ smartphone use. The present study explored the prevalence and correlates of problematic smartphone use (PSU) among Chinese university students. Few studies have investigated relationships between PSU and factors such as academic anxiety, academic procrastination, self-regulation, and subjective wellbeing. The present study proposed and tested a hypothetical model of relationships between PSU and these factors. A total of 475 Chinese university students completed a paper-based surve…





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