(McMaster University) Killing cancer cells indirectly by powering up fat cells in the bone marrow could help acute myeloid leukemia patients, says a study from McMaster University published in Nature Cell Biology. Researchers with the McMaster Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute found that boosting adipocytes, or fat cells, located in the bone morrow suppressed cancerous leukemia cells but — in a surprise to the research team — also induced the regeneration of healthy blood cells.

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Publication date: Available online 9 November 2017Source: Seminars in Cancer BiologyAuthor(s): Christian Flotho, Sebastian Sommer, Michael LübbertAbstractMyelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal bone marrow disorder, typically of older adults, which is characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, peripheral blood cytopenias and risk of progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is an aggressive myeloproliferative neoplasm occurring in young children. The common denominator of these malignant myeloid disorders is the limited benefit of conventional chemotherapy and a particular resp…

ConclusionCollectively, our data confirm the engraftment of primary human CD34+ leukemic cells in chick embryo liver, but other experiments are required to verify engraftment in BM and spleen, and to confirm the identity of a putative CD34 orthologous transcript in these two organs.

Publication date: April 2018Source: Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection, Volume 51, Issue 2Author(s): Gu-Lung Lin, Hsiu-Hao Chang, Chun-Yi Lu, Chung-Ming Chen, Meng-Yao Lu, Ping-Ing Lee, Shiann-Tarng Jou, Yung-Li Yang, Li-Min Huang, Luan-Yin ChangAbstractBackgroundInvasive fungal infection (IFI) causes significant morbidity and mortality in patients with hematological malignancies, especially those with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), recurrent acute leukemia, high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The study aimed to investigate the clinical charact…

Adding chimeric antigen receptors to T cells (CAR-T), causing them to aggressively target cancer cells, has proven to be a fruitful approach to the treatment of cancer. Like most immunotherapies, it can result in potentially severe side-effects related to excessive immune activation, but it is also quite effective. Treatment of forms of leukemia in particular has produced good results in a large fraction of patients who have trialed the therapy. In the research reported here, scientists extend the chimeric antigen receptor approach to natural killer cells rather than T cells, noting that this may prove to be both safer and…

Source: Fight Aging!Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

AbstractThe myelodysplastic syndromes, the chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms, and the acute myeloid leukemia are malignancies of the myeloid hematopoietic stem cells of the bone marrow. The diseases are characterized by a dysregulation of the immune system as both the cytokine milieu, immune phenotype, immune regulation, and expression of genes related to immune cell functions are deregulated. Several treatment strategies try to circumvent this deregulation, and several clinical and preclinical trials have shown promising results, albeit not in the same scale as chimeric antigen receptor T cells have had in the treatmen…

Publication date: Available online 9 November 2017Source: Seminars in Cancer BiologyAuthor(s): Christian Flotho, Sebastian Sommer, Michael LübbertAbstractMyelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal bone marrow disorder, typically of older adults, which is characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, peripheral blood cytopenias and risk of progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is an aggressive myeloproliferative neoplasm occurring in young children. The common denominator of these malignant myeloid disorders is the limited benefit of conventional chemotherapy and a particular resp…

ConclusionCollectively, our data confirm the engraftment of primary human CD34+ leukemic cells in chick embryo liver, but other experiments are required to verify engraftment in BM and spleen, and to confirm the identity of a putative CD34 orthologous transcript in these two organs.

Publication date: April 2018Source: Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection, Volume 51, Issue 2Author(s): Gu-Lung Lin, Hsiu-Hao Chang, Chun-Yi Lu, Chung-Ming Chen, Meng-Yao Lu, Ping-Ing Lee, Shiann-Tarng Jou, Yung-Li Yang, Li-Min Huang, Luan-Yin ChangAbstractBackgroundInvasive fungal infection (IFI) causes significant morbidity and mortality in patients with hematological malignancies, especially those with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), recurrent acute leukemia, high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The study aimed to investigate the clinical charact…

Conclusions: Our study provided new insights into the mutational spectrum and molecular signatures of AML-M0 and M1. We proposed thatFLT3-ITD,NPM1 andTP53 be identified as markers for risk stratification of AML-M0 and M1. Patients with AML-M0 and M1 would likely benefit from allo-HSCT.Cell Physiol Biochem 2018;47:1853 –1861

CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, our data suggest that an anti-CLL-1-ADC has the potential to become an effective and safer treatment for AML in humans, by reducing and allowing for faster recovery from initial cytopenias than the current generation of ADCs for AML.
PMID: 29959143 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Source: Clinical Cancer ResearchCategory: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Clin Cancer Res Source Type: research





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