On September 24, 2015, in a sixth floor room at Boston Children’s Hospital, 5-year-old Logan Lesselroth pressed the button that started the transfer of his newly harvested blood stem cells to his 3-year-old sister, Gianna.
“This,” Gianna told him, “is a gift from your body.”
The path to that moment and the stem cell transplant’s potential to cure Gianna of her relapsed leukemia was anything but straightforward. Logan has a genetic condition called medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD), which makes it difficult for his body to convert sugar to energy. Would his metabolic disorder be passed to Gianna? Would the disorder make it too risky for Logan to have his stem cells harvested?
Diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia at the age of 4½ months, Gianna achieved a remission that lasted two years. In May 2015, the leukemia was back. With that, Mike and Marissa Lesselroth sought options for their daughter in their home state of Florida and beyond. “We talked to her doctors in Florida, and they agreed that coming to Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s was the best choice for Gianna because they offered a lot of treatment options for relapsed leukemia,” Mike says.
Dr. Lewis Silverman, clinical director of Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center’s Hematologic Malignancy Center, recommended Gianna first try a chemotherapy clinical trial, followed by a stem cell transplan…

Source: Thrive, Children’s Hospital BostonCategory: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia CAR T-cell Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center Dr. Lewis Silverman Dr. Olaf Bodamer Dr. Steven Margossian Hematologic Malignancy Center Source Type: news

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Curry J, Featherston S, Foglesong J, Shoberu B, Gulbis A, Mireles ME, Hafemeister L, Nguyen C, Kapoor N, Rezvani K, Neelapu SS, Shpall EJ, Pediatric Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis Investigators (PALISI) Network
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In 2017, an autologous chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy indicated for children and young adults with relapsed and/or refractory CD19+ acute lymphoblastic leukaemia became the first gene therapy to be approved in the USA. This innovative form of cellular immunotherapy has been associated with remarkable response rates but is also associated with unique and often severe toxicities, which …

Source: Clinical Lymphoma and MyelomaCategory: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Nat Rev Clin Oncol Source Type: research

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Source: Pediatric Blood and CancerCategory: Cancer & Oncology Authors:

CONCLUSIONS: These data provide the first national, population-based estimates of fertility documentation for AYA cancer patients in Australia. Documentation of fertility-related discussions was poor, with higher rates observed in hospitals with greater experience of treating AYA patients.
PMID: 29784137 [PubMed – in process]

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(American Society of Clinical Oncology) In a federally funded, randomized phase III clinical trial performed by the Children’s Oncology Group (COG), 90 percent of children and young adults with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) or T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LL) were alive four years after starting treatment regimens on this trial, and 84 percent were cancer free. These are the highest survival rates for these T-cell malignancies reported to date, according to the authors.

Authors: Simioni C, Zauli G, Martelli AM, Vitale M, Ultimo S, Milani D, Neri LM
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A decreased physical fitness has been reported in patients and survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). This is influenced by the negative effects of the disease and by the treatments of childhood cancer. In the past, children were advised to recover in bed, and to take as much relax as possible. Nowadays, it is considered that too much immobility may result in a further decrease of physical fitness and functioning. Exercise training for ALL children has frequently been reported to improve physical fitness and the well-…

Source: OncotargetCategory: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncotarget Source Type: research

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(UT Southwestern Medical Center) A historic study involving researchers from UT Southwestern’s Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center demonstrates the effectiveness of CAR-T therapy, which uses genetically modified immune cells to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children and young adults.





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