When I was a kid, I fell asleep in school a lot. The teachers didn’t scold me, and they kept the other kids from pointing and laughing. Because I wasn’t just tired  —  I was exhausted. I was drained. I was going through chemo.
When I was 7, I was diagnosed with Burkitt’s lymphoma, an aggressive cancer. The doctors at Boston Children’s Hospital gave me two months to live. I spent four years in and out of aggressive treatments, missing second and third grade, fighting for my life when I should’ve been playing hockey.
But slowly, I recovered. My community stood by my family, and my dad’s union insurance made it possible for us to afford costly treatment. By the time I was a teenager, some of my friends didn’t even know I had been sick.

 
 
I can’t imagine what would’ve happened if my family didn’t have insurance. My treatment would’ve bankrupted us.

Cancer is hard enough on a family. Imagine having to choose between saving your child and staying in your house? Or saving your child and selling the car you use to get to work?

I can’t imagine what would’ve happened if my family didn’t have insurance. My treatment would’ve bankrupted us.

The health care bill that’s racing through the Senate right now is designed to do just that — make cash-strapped families pay for situations beyond their control, and put the savings toward tax cuts for the ultra-ri…

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The adolescents and young adult (AYA) population represent a group wherein mature B-cell lymphomas constitute a significant proportion of the overall malignancies that occur. Among these are aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs), which are predominantly diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma, and Burkitt lymphoma. For the most part, there is remarkable divide in how pediatric/adolescent patients (under the age of 18 years) with lymphoma are treated vs their young adult counterparts, and molecular data are lacking, especially in pediatric and AYA series. The outcome for AYA patients with…

Source: BloodCategory: Hematology Authors: Tags: Pediatric Hematology, Lymphoid Neoplasia, Review Articles, Review Series, Clinical Trials and Observations Source Type: research

Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is the most common pediatric cancer in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), and also occurs frequently among adolescents and young adults (AYAs), often associated with HIV. Treating BL in SSA poses particular challenges. Although highly effective, high-intensity cytotoxic treatments used in resource-rich settings are usually not feasible, and lower-intensity continuous infusion approaches are impractical. In this article, based on evidence from the region, we review management strategies for SSA focused on diagnosis and use of prephase and definitive treatment. Additionally, potentially better approaches for ris…

Source: BloodCategory: Hematology Authors: Tags: Pediatric Hematology, How I Treat, Free Research Articles, Lymphoid Neoplasia, Clinical Trials and Observations Source Type: research

ConclusionsSystematic monitoring and analysis of lymphoma paediatric data would provide clinical and epidemiological information to improve the health care of these patients and the outcomes for these malignancies in Spain.

CONCLUSIONSAmong children and adolescents, solid organ transplant recipients contribute a substantial fraction of NHL diagnoses, particularly DLBCL diagnoses. This fraction has increased over time. Prevention efforts targeted toward this group could reduce the overall pediatric NHL burden. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

Source: CancerCategory: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

In this report, we present a case of Burkitt’s lymphoma with unusual presentation with the involvement of
both thorax and the whole of the abdomen.
PMID: 28393514 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Summary
Non‐Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is a heterogeneous group of lymphoid malignancies accounting for a significant portion of cancers occurring in children, adolescents and young adults with an increasing incidence with age. The adolescent and young adult (AYA) population presents a specific set of characteristics and challenges. The most common diseases occurring in adolescents and young adults include Burkitt lymphoma, lymphoblastic lymphoma, diffuse large B‐cell lymphoma, anaplastic large cell lymphoma and primary mediastinal B‐cell lymphoma. There is also a higher incidence of primary central nervous system lympho…

Source: British Journal of HaematologyCategory: Hematology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research

Conclusion: Fear of breast cancer and permanent damage to the breast leads to low-threshold medical consultations and referrals. Sensitive handling is required especially in adolescent patients. Most disorders arise due to the variability of breast development. Ultrasound serves as a means to exclude significant diseases of the breast.
PMID: 26844709 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Source: Ultraschall in der MedizinCategory: Radiology Authors: Tags: Ultraschall Med Source Type: research

Although suicide among childhood cancer survivors is rare, there is still a significantly higher risk in this population than in healthy adolescents. A 17-year-old girl cured of Burkitt lymphoma committed suicide after completing her treatment. She had nev…

Laura Veneroni, Andrea Ferrari, Maura Massimino, Clerici C AlfredoJournal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2015 11(3):667-667Although suicide among childhood cancer survivors is rare, there is still a significantly higher risk in this population than in healthy adolescents. A 17-year-old girl cured of Burkitt lymphoma committed suicide after completing her treatment. She had never previously shown signs of psychological suffering and was in good general health. This case made the operators wonder how this tragic possibility might be prevented. It is essential for the ongoing monitoring of the psychological and social su…

Abstract
There is a growing understanding that several infectious agents are acquired in early life and this is the reason why available vaccines target the new born, infants, and adolescents. Infectious agents are associated with cancer development and it is estimated that about 20% of the world’s cancer burden is attributed to infectious agents. There is a growing evidence that certain infectious agents acquired in early life can give rise to cancer development, but estimates of the cancer burden from this early‐life acquisition is unknown. In this article, we have selected five cancers (cervical, liver, Burkitt’s lymp…

Source: Cancer MedicineCategory: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research





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