The NHS will embark on a £20 million a year programme to vaccinate all 12 and 13 year old males against the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus, which causes oral cancer.

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When the HPV vaccine first hit the U.S. market in 2006, it was approved only for girls. Boys got the green light three years later — but a new study suggests there’s still a gender gap in vaccination rates.
The HPV vaccine — administered in either two or three doses — protects against human papillomavirus, a common sexually transmitted disease that can lead to cervical, vaginal, anal, penile, mouth and throat cancers. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that all children get the vaccine when they’re 11 or 12 years old, though it’s approved for use in people up…

Source: TIME: HealthCategory: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

When Henrietta Lacks was being treated for cervical cancer more than 60 years ago, her cells were taken for medical research without her consent. This ethical controversy became the subject of a 2010 best-selling book, Rebecca Skloot’s The Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks, and now an HBO movie of the same name starring Oprah Winfrey.
Despite radiation therapy and surgery, Lacks died from the cancer in 1951. But her cells, known to scientists as HeLa cells, have played a role in many scientific advancements ― and have helped protect other young women from the cervical cancer that took Lacks’ lif…

Abstract
: The prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oral cancers has been rising, the cancers occurring in adults at a younger age than HPV-negative oral cancers typically do and in men more often than women. Patients who are diagnosed often don’t understand the disease’s etiology. Because HPV is sexually transmitted, diagnosis with an HPV-related oral cancer may prompt feelings of shame, embarrassment, and guilt. There are currently three vaccines for HPV. It’s essential for nurses to educate patients on HPV transmission and HPV-related oral cancer, thus helping to mitigate the stigma and dispel myths…

The prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV)–related oral cancers has been rising, the cancers occurring in adults at a younger age than HPV-negative oral cancers typically do and in men more often than women. Patients who are diagnosed often don’t understand the disease’s etiology. Because HPV is sexually transmitted, diagnosis with an HPV-related oral cancer may prompt feelings of shame, embarrassment, and guilt. There are currently three vaccines for HPV. It’s essential for nurses to educate patients on HPV transmission and HPV-related oral cancer, thus helping to mitigate the stigma and dispel myths, and to promo…

Source: AJNCategory: Nursing Tags: Feature Articles Source Type: research

Abstract
Frank discussion is essential to both treatment and prevention.
ABSTRACT: The prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oral cancers has been rising, the cancers occurring in adults at a younger age than HPV-negative oral cancers typically do and in men more often than women. Patients who are diagnosed often don’t understand the disease’s etiology. Because HPV is sexually transmitted, diagnosis with an HPV-related oral cancer may prompt feelings of shame, embarrassment, and guilt. There are currently three vaccines for HPV. It’s essential for nurses to educate patients on HPV transmission and …

If there were a vaccine that could protect your 11-year-old son from getting cancer as an adult, you’d make sure he got it, right?
As it turns out, this immunization exists, but a majority of young boys are not adequately protected, as journalist Jane Brody noted in The New York Times on Tuesday.
The human papillomavirus vaccine ― which protects against HPV-associated cancers including throat and tongue, cervical, vaginal, vulvar, anal, and penile cancers ― is strongly recommended as cancer prevention for 11- and 12-year-old boys and girls by the U.S. Centers of Disease Control and Prevention.
The bad n…

Conclusions: Sexual risk-taking behavior associated with HPV infection is high among university students, while knowledge of the association between HPV and head and neck cancer is low. These findings provide impetus for developing specifically targeted interventions that serve to increase head and neck cancer knowledge, improve HPV vaccine education and uptake, and mitigate sexual risk-taking behaviors among college-aged students.Citation Format: Nosayaba Osazuwa-Peters, Kara M. Christopher, Christian Geneus, Rebecca Rohde, Ronald J. Walker, Mark A. Varvares. Assessing university students’ sexual risk behavior, knowledge …

Source: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and PreventionCategory: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Prevention Behaviors: Poster Presentations – Proffered Abstracts Source Type: research

When Charlie Sheen disclosed his HIV infection last fall, sexually transmitted infections were back in the public eye. His case will likely contribute to the belief many people have that HIV is caused by sexual promiscuity or injection drug use, when in reality having unprotected sex with someone HIV-positive just one time can lead to HIV infection. April is STD Awareness Month. The new term for STD is STI — sexually transmitted infection — to focus on the infection rather than the disease it could lead to. One way to mark the occasion is to get tested for HIV and thus help eradicate the stigma. A focus on HIV for STD A…

By Stacy Simon The American Cancer Society is supporting a call-to-action from dozens of National Cancer Institute-designated Cancer Centers across the US urging action to increase vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV vaccines protect against high-risk types of the virus that cause most cervical cancers. The virus is also linked to cancers of the vulva, vagina, penis, anus, and throat. Despite this, vaccination rates across the US remain low. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), only 40% of girls and 21% of boys in the US have received all 3 doses of the vaccine. The CDC recomme…

Authors: Feucht C, VandenBussche H
Abstract
The ideal contraceptive agent remains elusive for the adolescent population. Contraceptive failure is often caused by inappropriate or inconsistent use, and discontinuation within the first year is not uncommon. Various methods have been explored within the adolescent population to increase efficacy rates, minimize side effects, and prevent unwanted pregnancies. The use of intrauterine devices and continuous use of combined oral contraceptives may lead to greater efficacy because of the ease of use and reduction in menstrual symptoms. Recent literature supports the contin…





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